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Training course: Copyright for teaching and learning

The following course is available to academic staff and research students

Copyright for teaching and research

Date: Mon 6 Feb 2017
Time: 10.00-12.00
Venue: Bute Annexe - CAPOD Training Room 4 (beside front entrance of Bute Building)
Key details: New this year! Copyright affects many areas of academic activity and it is becoming increasingly important for staff and students to be aware of the copyright laws and licences which affect their teaching, learning and research.

The course will cover a wide range of topics, and includes a section on Copyright and Open Access: copyright issues which arise when you submit an article to an Open Access journal, or publish in traditional venues and want to share your work.

It will be a valuable workshop for teaching and research staff and research students in all disciplines (including PGRs who teach). By the end of this workshop you should be able to:
  • Conduct your teaching and research without infringing copyright.
  • Request permission to use third party copyright material in your own work.
  • Address copyright issues appopriately when you want to make your publications Open Access.
  • Request digitised course-readings for your students.
  • Make the appropriate checks before you arrange for your lectures to be filmed.

For full details and to book a place, see PDMS course booking

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