21 September 2016

Kathryn Rudy's new book published, and it's open access!


© Universiteitsbibliotheek van Amsterdam, CC BY 4.0.
Kathryn Rudy, senior lecturer in the School of Art History, has just published her latest book with Open Book Publishers. The book is licensed under a creative commons CC BY licence, and so is freely available for download from the publisher and our repository. The ebook has also been added to our library catalogue by Elizabeth Cuthill, who has been mentioned before on this blog for her work creating high quality MARC records for this publisher, you can see the catalogue record here: http://library.st-andrews.ac.uk/record=b2429660~S5. This work isn't just for the benefit of St Andrews, it also benefits the library community at large, as these records are fed back to Open Book Publishers for distribution to other parties.

Here is a snippet from the book's abstract to whet your appetite:

Medieval manuscripts resisted obsolescence[...]Rather than discard them when they were superseded, book owners found ways to update, amend and upcycle books or book parts.
Rudy considers ways in which book owners adjusted the contents of their books from the simplest (add a marginal note, sew in a curtain) to the most complex (take the book apart, embellish the components with painted decoration, add more quires of parchment). By making sometimes extreme adjustments, book owners kept their books fashionable and emotionally relevant. This study explores the intersection of codicology and human desire.
Rudy shows how increased modularisation of book making led to more standardisation but also to more opportunities for personalisation. She asks: What properties did parchment manuscripts have that printed books lacked? What are the interrelationships among technology, efficiency, skill loss and standardisation?
© Uppsala Universitetsbiblioteket, CC BY 4.0.


A previous blog post about Open Book Publishers can be read here. In the post we highlighted the cataloguing team's work to create MARC records for all the books on the OBP catalogue (no small feat!). We also looked at some of the interesting and novel ways that OBP are trying to escape the bonds of print, by incorporating alternative media into the electronic versions of their books.




Kathryn M. Rudy, Piety in Pieces: How Medieval Readers Customized their Manuscripts. Cambridge, UK: Open Book Publishers, 2016. http://dx.doi.org/10.11647/OBP.0094

8 September 2016

St Andrews supports new publisher requirements set by Wellcome Trust

Wellcome Trust has had an Open Access policy for its research publications since 2005, and now leads the Charity Open Access Fund (COAF). Robert Kiley, Head of Digital Services at Wellcome, has announced that from 1 April 2017 any papers submitted that acknowledge Wellcome funding must meet the new, additional requirements. Publishers must indicate that they can meet the service standards by 15 December 2016 to be included in a list that Wellcome will make public. Outputs will be audited to check that listed publishers continue to meet services standards.

Summary

Existing

  • Available from the Europe PMC repository 
  • Made available under a Creative Commons attribution licence 
  • Deposited as the final published version

Additional

  • Publisher invoices must include digital object identifier (DOI), authors, funders and licence 
  • Publisher must have a publicly available reimbursement policy 
  • Publisher must update deposited articles with post-publication material changes

Aims

It is hoped that these changes will:
  • improve article processing charge (APC) processes and minimise post-publication licence corrections; 
  • help authors, funders and institutions determine whether an APC can be reimbursed from COAF; 
  • increase the integrity of funder-designated repositories and the scholarly record by ensuring that the most up-to-date, accurate publication is available.
Although the requirements might seem onerous several major publishers such as Wiley and Springer Nature have already confirmed their ability to comply. Many publishers that already systematically deposit into Europe PubMed Central as part of their Gold publication service already update articles with corrections, retractions and expressions of concern (CREs).

There is widespread community support amongst charities and sector bodies (Jisc, SCONUL, UKCoRR, and Research Libraries UK). The Open Access Support team agrees that the new publisher requirements will help everyone concerned to better understand what is needed for compliance, their obligations, and improve the accuracy and availability of research outputs for re-use. Wellcome has established a reputation as an Open Access leader and many funders including government shadow its initiatives. We hope this initiative might positively encourage publishers to deliver their advertised services and help reduce non-compliance with other funder mandates too.

COAF funded research organisations