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Getty Publications publishes two open access catalogues

Mosaic of a Lion Attacking an Onage. http://www.getty.edu/publications/romanmosaics/. CC BY. © 2016 J. Paul Getty Trust
In 2014, Getty Publications launched its Virtual Library, initially offering access to 250 books, many of which were out of print. The collection features books which relate to the Getty Museum or Institutes, and span a wide variety of subjects, including photography, religion, literature, and archaeology. This month saw the introduction of two further items to the collection, and what the Getty President and CEO James Cuno described as “a next step in our ongoing commitment to open content"(James Cuno, press release). These latest additions are online catalogues, which highlight antiquities in the Getty Museum. Both were released with Creative Commons CC BY licences allowing almost unfettered use and reuse. Because these books were 'born digital' they offer more ways to view and even interact with the Getty collections, "from zoomable images to interactive maps, from linked footnotes and glossaries to 360-degree-views of objects." (The Getty)

Ferruzza, Maria Lucia. Ancient Terracottas from South Italy and Sicily in the J. Paul Getty Museum. Los Angeles: Getty Publications, 2016. http://www.getty.edu/publications/terracottas CC BY. © 2016 J. Paul Getty Trust

Belis, Alexis. Roman Mosaics in the J. Paul Getty Museum. Los Angeles: Getty Publications, 2016. http://www.getty.edu/publications/romanmosaics. © 2016 J. Paul Getty Trust



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