Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from May, 2015

Collabra is now open for submissions

The open access journal Collabra is now open for submissions. Collabra is a fully open access mega-journal covering three main fields of study: Ecology & Environmental Sciences, Life and Biomedical Sciences, and Social and Behavioural Sciences. We have blogged about Collabra previously, so if you are interested in finding out more check out our previous post here.

Here's a quick summary of Collabra:
It has a relatively low APC (Article Processing Charge) of $875 USDCollabra gives reviewers the option of receiving payment for their reviewsCollabra can waive the APC charge for those unable to payIt offers optional open peer-reviewUse of article-level metrics to track downloads, pageviews, and social-media sharingPost-publication commenting on articles.  Collabra has partnered with the platform provider Ubiquity Press - an open access publisher who provide a variety of journal hosting services (as well as book publishing). By entering into such a partnership, journals can share …

Open Access in the Netherlands: Solid citizens

Despite its small size the Netherlands is punching above its weight in Open Access practice and advocacy, driven by a strong sense of social justice.  As early as 2009 The National Library of the Netherlands was involved with the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) in a pilot project looking at long-term preservation of electronic journal collections.  The Hague is home to the Ligue des BibliothĂ©ques EuropĂ©ennes de Recherche (LIBER- Association of European Research Libraries). LIBER is currently coordinating the development of the EC FP7 Gold Open Access Pilot to pay article processing charges (APCs) for research papers up to 2 years beyond the life of the grant.  In April work translating the SHERPA/RoMEO interface into Dutch was completed and released while the translation of the publisher policies continues.  There is a national website for Open Access supported by Utrecht University Library.  Sander Dekker (pictured), the Dutch State Secretary Department of Education, Culture…

iFutures 2015 conference

The iFutures 2015 conference is now open for registration. The conference, now in its third year, is run by and for postgraduate researchers in the information science community. This year's event has the theme: "Open Information Science: Exploring New Landscapes".

"We want to know how is open information influencing your research? Openness is a key part of Information Science research, from using open source tools and big open data sets to open standards advocacy, creating open accessible environments in institutions, and opening information science to radical perspectives and exploring diverse communities. We want to hear about your research and how these themes relate to it." iFutures

The keynote speakers at the event are Fabio Ciravegna (Professor of Computer Science at Sheffield University) and Helen Kennedy (Professor of Sociology at Sheffield University). The event will also include student presentations of research papers, workshops on impact, as well …

Open access in the United States: land of the free (access to research)

In 2013, a memo from John Holdren, director for the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) at the White House, was sent to all heads of executive departments and agencies:

“The Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) hereby directs each Federal agency with over $100 million in annual conduct of research and development expenditures to develop a plan to support increased public access to the results of research funded by the Federal Government. This includes any results published in peer-reviewed scholarly publications that are based on research that directly arises from Federal funds” OSTP memo p.2

Affected agencies were to be responsible for coming up with a plan to open up research outputs as well as data in line with the agenda set out in the memorandum. Plans would be required to have a number of key elements: fostering public/private partnerships, improving public access to data, improving access to research through searching and archiving facilities, etc.

The me…

Open Access in China: A breach in the Great Firewall?

You might not necessarily associate China with Open Access, but it has made rapid progress towards making more of its research publications open. Two powerful public agencies are instigating Open Access into Chinese scholarship - the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC). Both signed the Berlin Declaration (2003 & 2004). Just last year Beijing co-hosted the Global Research Council that discussed the GRC Open Access Action Plan.

In the same month Nature reported that CAS and NSFC had announced their Open Access mandate that with immediate effect researchers must deposit their papers into online repositories to make public within 12 months of publication. This appears to be what we would call delayed, Green OA and mirrors the US National Institutes of Health mandate and Hefce's Open Access policy in the UK. The mandates apply to researchers (CAS/NSFC) and graduate students (CAS) and CAS also encourages its researchers to u…

Catalogue records now available for Open Book Publishers titles

Regular readers might remember a previous post about about the Library's collection of Open Access e-books from Open Book Publishers (OBP).  The Library's expert cataloguers have completed their work creating records in the proprietary MARC* format for each title.  These records are now available for libraries and institutions to import into their library management systems. They include all OBP books published until the end of March 2015 and will be updated as new titles are released.

We hope that making high quality metadata available in this way will remove a potential barrier when librarians are considering whether to include Open Access books in their collection. This effort also shows how readers, authors, publishers and institutions can benefit from Open Access publishing models. The Library catalogue currently lists fifty-five OPB books and we encourage readers to dive in!
St Andrews Library is enjoying working with an Open Access publisher and learning from the collab…