22 February 2017

New Horizon 2020 project to enhance open access book publishing


A new EU Horizon 2020 project has been announced, entitled High Integration of Research Monographs in the European Open Science infrastructure, or HIRMEOS for short. We've written on this blog numerous times about open access books, see previous posts here and here, and from what is known about this project it certainly could be a very important next step in advancing open access long-form publishing in the Humanities and Social sciences.

The participants in this project are:


The HIRMIOS project partners have been charged with the task of enhancing the technical standards and interoperability of five open access monograph publishing platforms, and embedding these enhanced systems in the European Open Science Cloud*. The open access publishers included in the project are Ubiquity Press, OpenEdition Books, OAPEN Library, Göttingen University Press and EKT Open Book Press. According to the Project blurb, these publishers will be enhanced in the following ways:
"[They will be provided with] tools that enable identification, authentication and interoperability (DOI, ORCID, Fundref), and tools that enrich information and entity extraction (INRIA (N)ERD), the ability to annotate monographs (Hypothes.is), and gather usage and alternative metric data." (http://cordis.europa.eu/project/rcn/206340_en.html)
The project will also assist the automatic ingesting of content into Directory of Open Access Books (DOAB), and will create better indexing capabilities, as well as a certification system to better document information about peer-review. Currently DOAB offers open access to almost 6000 peer-reviewed academic books. 

Certainly this sounds like a very interesting project and it is encouraging to see a large investment in new models for open access in the Humanities and Social Sciences It is also particularly encouraging to see multiple publishers working together to create open source tools that can enable other burgeoning publishers to improve their systems. 

The project website is here: http://cordis.europa.eu/project/rcn/206340_en.html

*The first report detailing recommendations for the European Open Science Cloud can be downloaded here: http://ec.europa.eu/research/openscience/pdf/realising_the_european_open_science_cloud_2016.pdf.

7 February 2017

National Open Access strategy for Switzerland

The Swiss National Science Foundation and swissuniversities have come together to agree a national strategy aiming for all publications financed with Swiss public money to be accessible free of charge by 2024.

The joint principles and strategy are outlined in a document published on 31 Jan 2017, which states "all stakeholders, politicians, higher education institutions (and their libraries) and funders have to join forces to pursue common goals" - including aligning existing OA policies and supporting new OA publishing models.

Further information is available from the SNSF news item.


Vision from Swiss National Strategy on Open Access

31 January 2017

Training course: Copyright for teaching and learning

The following course is available to academic staff and research students

Copyright for teaching and research

Date: Mon 6 Feb 2017
Time: 10.00-12.00
Venue: Bute Annexe - CAPOD Training Room 4 (beside front entrance of Bute Building)
Key details: New this year! Copyright affects many areas of academic activity and it is becoming increasingly important for staff and students to be aware of the copyright laws and licences which affect their teaching, learning and research.

The course will cover a wide range of topics, and includes a section on Copyright and Open Access: copyright issues which arise when you submit an article to an Open Access journal, or publish in traditional venues and want to share your work.

It will be a valuable workshop for teaching and research staff and research students in all disciplines (including PGRs who teach). By the end of this workshop you should be able to:
  • Conduct your teaching and research without infringing copyright.
  • Request permission to use third party copyright material in your own work.
  • Address copyright issues appopriately when you want to make your publications Open Access.
  • Request digitised course-readings for your students.
  • Make the appropriate checks before you arrange for your lectures to be filmed.

For full details and to book a place, see PDMS course booking

27 October 2016

Open in Action conversations

As described in our last post, the theme of this year's Open Access Week 'Open in Action' was all about taking concrete steps to open up research and scholarship and encouraging others to do the same.



With this in mind, the Library invited all researchers to join their OA experts at a range of drop-in sessions. To share the outcomes of these conversations even further, we have listed the most commonly asked questions here along with the support available from the Open Access team and colleagues.

The main themes discussed so far have been:

Focus on ‘acceptance’

The key message is to ‘act on acceptance’ and deposit all articles and proceedings in Pure (the University’s research system) along with the full date of acceptance. Most authors find this easiest to do in the active period following acceptance, and most publishers allow accepted versions (not published pdfs) to be made open access by this route. See our web page for a 2 minute 'deposit demo'.

Not just for REF

Making your work Open is not just about compliance with REF policies. The University expects staff to deposit ALL articles in Pure, not just those you expect to submit to REF. This is not only because we don't yet know the shape of the next REF, but that we want to give visibility to all research outputs. Researchers can add all kinds of research publications and activities in Pure, and make links with their projects and underlying data. The Library provides integrated support on using Pure – contact the Pure Helpdesk for advice or training.
 

The cost of Open Access

Most publishers offer a paid route to Open Access, known as the ‘gold’ route. Except for a few cases where research funders prefer this route, the good news is you don’t have to pay extra for making your work open in traditional journals. Use the ‘green’ route, and all it costs is a few minutes of your time to deposit in Pure.

'Open in Action' conversations: Questions and answers 

 

Q: does my publisher allow open access after I deposit in Pure?

Almost always the answer is "Yes", though there may be conditions. You are normally permitted to deposit your author-created accepted version following peer-review, but not proofs or published versions. There might also be an embargo period before the deposited version can be made Open. Don't worry, the Library will take care of this provided you deposit on acceptance!

Q: do I have to do this for everything?

As mentioned above - you should deposit ALL articles in Pure, not just those you expect to submit to REF. Open Access is not just for Christmas (or REF)!
You can choose to make other outputs such as book chapters Open Access, provided we can get permission from publishers - contact us for advice.

Q: what information do I need to add in Pure? 

Fill in the mandatory fields when creating a record, and make sure to add the full date of acceptance for articles and proceedings. When you upload a file, set the document version as 'accepted author manuscript' and choose access as 'Open'. You can also link any projects or underlying data under 'Relations'. The Library will enhance the records and take care of the rest.

Q: can you explain more about the date of acceptance?

Yes we can! In short: once peer review stages are complete, 'date of acceptance' is when you are made aware that all academically necessary changes have been made in response to reviewer comments. Hefce has published official advice. There are many queries around this, and a call to the OA team might be the best way to resolve them. The key thing is to decide on the most appropriate date and add it in Pure.

Q: do I have to pay for Open Access?

There is no charge for depositing in Pure - the 'green' route to OA. You are not expected to pay for OA to be compliant with the REF OA Policy. There will only be a charge if you have chosen a fully open access journal that charges APCs rather than subscriptions, or if your funder has stricter requirements that means you need to choose the 'gold' route.

Q: I chose 'Gold' OA, do I still need to deposit in Pure?

Yes - you need to deposit your article in Pure in all cases, so please deposit the accepted version as soon as possible. This makes sure we can report effectively and provide advice as early as possible. In the case of articles with Creative Commons licences, we will be able to make the final version Open Access.

Q: Will deposit in Pure meet my funder's requirements?

Not always. Certain funders such as MRC, EU (Horizon2020) and Wellcome Trust have strict limits on embargo periods and a preference for immediate Open Access. In some cases we can provide help with funding to pay APCs, or you may be able to use your grant - see more on research funder's policies.

Q: Can you tell me more about the content I can put in Pure, and how this makes research outputs more visible?

The best way to find out more about Pure is to check the Pure web pages or contact the Pure Helpdesk for advice or training. Pure provides web services to make content available from School web pages as well as the main Research Portal.


If you have additional questions - or want to arrange a drop-in specially for your School or department, get in touch with us at openaccess@st-andrews.ac.uk

Meanwhile, get into the OA habit so you can benefit from the wide audience your work deserves!

18 October 2016

Our commitment to putting Open in action

Open Access Week 2016 (24-30 Oct) aims to advance open access on a global scale, all year round. We introduced the theme of this year's event in an earlier post.

OA Week http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

This year's theme of 'Open in Action' is all about taking concrete steps to open up research and scholarship and encouraging others to do the same. (Nick Shockey, http://www.openaccessweek.org/profiles/blogs/commit-to-putting-open-in-action)
See a range of ideas for taking action at the Open in Action Portal including discovering Open Access journals in your discipline and starting conversations about Open Access.

The St Andrews Open Access team is making a commitment to enabling conversations about Open Access. During October we have already had many conversations, thanks to the School of Management inviting us to the Gateway for Open Access drop-in sessions. We took a practical approach, looking at individual ressearch profiles in our research information system (Pure). One-to-ones allowed staff to put their own questions to the OA experts and check they felt ready to respond to OA policies and gain the benefits of OA.

We are holding 3 more drop-in sessions during Open Access Week, open to all St Andrews researchers. Come and meet the team, and make sure you are ready!

Monday 24th Oct – 13:00 – 16:00 The Gateway (cafĂ© area)
Tuesday 25th Oct – 13:00 – 16:00 Martyrs Kirk (New Park Seminar Room)
Thursday 27th Oct – 09:00 – 12:00 Martyrs Kirk (New Park Seminar Room)

All members of staff are welcome to drop-in to find out how we can help with:
  • how to deposit publications in Pure
  • Open Access for REF eligibility
  • checking funders' OA policies
  • advising on publishers' OA options
  • any other queries about Open Access


We can also provide information about support for Research Data Management, regarding:
  • uploading data in Pure
  • sharing your data
  • funders' policies on research data

21 September 2016

Kathryn Rudy's new book published, and it's open access!


© Universiteitsbibliotheek van Amsterdam, CC BY 4.0.
Kathryn Rudy, senior lecturer in the School of Art History, has just published her latest book with Open Book Publishers. The book is licensed under a creative commons CC BY licence, and so is freely available for download from the publisher and our repository. The ebook has also been added to our library catalogue by Elizabeth Cuthill, who has been mentioned before on this blog for her work creating high quality MARC records for this publisher, you can see the catalogue record here: http://library.st-andrews.ac.uk/record=b2429660~S5. This work isn't just for the benefit of St Andrews, it also benefits the library community at large, as these records are fed back to Open Book Publishers for distribution to other parties.

Here is a snippet from the book's abstract to whet your appetite:

Medieval manuscripts resisted obsolescence[...]Rather than discard them when they were superseded, book owners found ways to update, amend and upcycle books or book parts.
Rudy considers ways in which book owners adjusted the contents of their books from the simplest (add a marginal note, sew in a curtain) to the most complex (take the book apart, embellish the components with painted decoration, add more quires of parchment). By making sometimes extreme adjustments, book owners kept their books fashionable and emotionally relevant. This study explores the intersection of codicology and human desire.
Rudy shows how increased modularisation of book making led to more standardisation but also to more opportunities for personalisation. She asks: What properties did parchment manuscripts have that printed books lacked? What are the interrelationships among technology, efficiency, skill loss and standardisation?
© Uppsala Universitetsbiblioteket, CC BY 4.0.


A previous blog post about Open Book Publishers can be read here. In the post we highlighted the cataloguing team's work to create MARC records for all the books on the OBP catalogue (no small feat!). We also looked at some of the interesting and novel ways that OBP are trying to escape the bonds of print, by incorporating alternative media into the electronic versions of their books.




Kathryn M. Rudy, Piety in Pieces: How Medieval Readers Customized their Manuscripts. Cambridge, UK: Open Book Publishers, 2016. http://dx.doi.org/10.11647/OBP.0094

8 September 2016

St Andrews supports new publisher requirements set by Wellcome Trust

Wellcome Trust has had an Open Access policy for its research publications since 2005, and now leads the Charity Open Access Fund (COAF). Robert Kiley, Head of Digital Services at Wellcome, has announced that from 1 April 2017 any papers submitted that acknowledge Wellcome funding must meet the new, additional requirements. Publishers must indicate that they can meet the service standards by 15 December 2016 to be included in a list that Wellcome will make public. Outputs will be audited to check that listed publishers continue to meet services standards.

Summary

Existing

  • Available from the Europe PMC repository 
  • Made available under a Creative Commons attribution licence 
  • Deposited as the final published version

Additional

  • Publisher invoices must include digital object identifier (DOI), authors, funders and licence 
  • Publisher must have a publicly available reimbursement policy 
  • Publisher must update deposited articles with post-publication material changes

Aims

It is hoped that these changes will:
  • improve article processing charge (APC) processes and minimise post-publication licence corrections; 
  • help authors, funders and institutions determine whether an APC can be reimbursed from COAF; 
  • increase the integrity of funder-designated repositories and the scholarly record by ensuring that the most up-to-date, accurate publication is available.
Although the requirements might seem onerous several major publishers such as Wiley and Springer Nature have already confirmed their ability to comply. Many publishers that already systematically deposit into Europe PubMed Central as part of their Gold publication service already update articles with corrections, retractions and expressions of concern (CREs).

There is widespread community support amongst charities and sector bodies (Jisc, SCONUL, UKCoRR, and Research Libraries UK). The Open Access Support team agrees that the new publisher requirements will help everyone concerned to better understand what is needed for compliance, their obligations, and improve the accuracy and availability of research outputs for re-use. Wellcome has established a reputation as an Open Access leader and many funders including government shadow its initiatives. We hope this initiative might positively encourage publishers to deliver their advertised services and help reduce non-compliance with other funder mandates too.

COAF funded research organisations